INFORMATION ON THE HISTORY OF BLOOD TRANSFUSION – VARIOUS SOURCES

Transcripts of articles and chapters from textbooks that contain information relating to the general subject of the ‘history of transfusion’.

This short review article provides a summary of some of the more important milestones in the history/development of blood transfusion from the first transfusions of Lower and Denis.

This well written and authoritative article provides an excellent overview of James Blundell’s life and work, as well as listing and summarising the first blood transfusions performed by him.

This excellent ‘brief’ article does in fact cover a wide range of topics from the work of some of the early pioneers (such as Lower and Blundell) to later investigators (such as Landsteiner, Levine, Wiener, Race and Sanger) and includes the important effects that WW1, the Spanish Civil War and WW2 had on the development of anticoagulation, blood banking and plasma fractionation respectively.

A transcript of an article originally published in 2013 in the journal ‘Gift of Blood’, the official publication of the Association of Voluntary Blood Donors, West Bengal (AVBDWB).

This article was originally published in the journal Rakt Daan in 1963 and contains information relating to the ancient history of blood transfusion.

A transcript of an illustrated booklet published in 1945 that contains a large amount of factual information regarding blood transfusion in the UK during WW2 and which, for a public information and ‘donor recruitment / motivation’ booklet, provides some remarkably detailed information.

This landmark 1922 publication was the first textbook on the subject of Blood Transfusion to be published in the UK, at a time when transfusion as a practical procedure and form of treatment was only just gaining acceptance.  As such, because of its historical interest, the complete book rather than just the historical introduction (Chapter I – Historical Sketch) has been transcribed.

Transcript of the first chapter of this textbook originally published in 1942 titled ‘History’ that provides an extensive overview of the history of transfusion.

This short article, originally published in the British Journal of Hospital Medicine in 2007 provides a concise and valuable source of historical background information regarding James Blundell.

This 1935 paper provides an insight into the life and work the 17th century Frenchman who was one of the first people to identify the concept of blood transfusion and whose own [unsupported] writings claim priority for performing a blood transfusion.

This is a transcript of a chapter from the booklet ‘The Flow of Life’ published by Blood Systems Inc, USA in 1980 that summarises some of the essential points relating to the history of blood transfusion.

Transcript of the first chapter of this textbook, originally published in 1951, titled ‘Historical Survey and General Principles’ that provides an overview of various aspects of the history of transfusion.

Transcript of the fourth chapter of this textbook, originally published in 1962, titled ‘History of Blood Transfusion’ that provides an illustrated overview of aspects of the early history of transfusion.

Transcript of the illustrated first chapter of this textbook, originally published in 1978, titled ‘The History of Blood Transfusion’ that provides an overview of various aspects of the transfusion history to the 1970s.

This two-part article, originally published in the journal Medical Laboratory World in 1984, provides interesting background information about the discovery of the ABO system, anticoagulation and other established historical events [including the Fisher-Race Rh terminology] as well as the organisation of the blood services in the UK prior to WW2 and for the first three decades after WW2.

As would be expected, this article, originally published in the British Journal of Anaesthesia in 1959, gives prominence to James Blundell but also provides information regarding the contributions made by Alfred Higginson, James Aveling, Graily Hewitt and Robert McDonnell, as well as other people in Britain who designed different types of blood transfusion equipment or proposed methods of anticoagulation.

Transcript of the seventh chapter of this textbook, originally published in 1909, titled ‘A Brief History of Blood Transfusion’ that provides an overview of various aspects of the early history of transfusion.

This is a transcript of a text that provides information about the pace of change regarding blood transfusion during WWII and of some of the people in England who were primarily responsible.

This document, written in Manchester in 1990, provides important historical information regarding the developmental roles of a Blood Centre and the organisation of the Blood Service in England at that time.

This article, published in the journal Rakt Daan (date unknown - believed to be 1951-2) gives an historical insight into the work carried out by Landsteiner and Wiener, especially the early work relating to the MN and Rh blood groups.

This article examines the views that people had of blood and transfusion in the mid to late seventeenth century and relates them to some of the views expressed today associated with the transfusion of blood.  The article also includes twenty-three images related to the history of transfusion.

This is a transcript of a number of undated documents prepared by Mr Peter Howell, used for demonstration purposes at a British Blood Transfusion Society Annual Meeting and subsequently used for display at the Manchester Blood Centre.

This article is a transcript of an ‘In Depth Tutorials and Information’ post in the ‘What-When-How’ internet series, which after a brief historical introduction identifies four American people who are stated to be ‘behind the invention’ of transfusion, providing historical information of two of them, Charles Drew and George Washington Crile.

The article provides an historical introduction, a description of the difficulties relating to blood grouping and indications for the transfusion of battle casualties, a section on the Spanish Civil War, and information on the ‘Blood for Britain’ programme as well as the British, Soviet and German blood programmes in WW2.

Transcript of the first chapter of this text, originally published in 1949, titled ‘Historical Perspective’, provides information on a number of aspects relating to “the first 275 years” of the history of transfusion but its main focus is on “the last 50 years”, i.e. the first half of the twentieth century.

This article provides an excellent example of one of the most important post-war methods of blood donor recruitment – newspaper articles that critically examines war-time compared with post-war blood donation and provides information about blood transfusion known at the time.

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